University Presbyterian Joins Blessed Trinity on Aug 19, 2021 Virtual Statewide Tour of Churches

New York Landmarks Conservancy
Virtual Statewide Tour of Churches
Thursday, August 19. 2021, 6 – 7 PM

You may have visited Blessed Trinity during one of the New York Landmarks Conservancy’s Sacred Sites Open House Weekends – an annual event held each May from 2010-19. After a pandemic cancellation in 2020, the Conservancy has chosen to restart with a virtual tour of 11 houses of worship in 6 different New York counties. Blessed Trinity and University Presbyterian Church, both located in Buffalo, are the only featured congregations from outside the Albany-NYC area.

Titled “Faith in the Empire State: Houses of Worship Across New York,” the hour-long  ZOOM presentation will visit sacred sites “funded and designed by residents of towns and cities from Long Island to the Great Lakes,” exploring contemporary uses as well as historical significance.

Today Blessed Trinity is home to a small, ethnically and racially diverse congregation. Founded in 1906, the parish originally served a rapidly growing community of mainly German and Irish immigrants. Under construction from 1923-28, the present Landmark church is adjacent to the original combination church and school built in 1907. Many local laborers and artisans were employed in its construction, using only materials manufactured or quarried in the United States. It is recognized as the purest replication of Twelfth Century Lombard-Romanesque architecture in the United States and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The structure’s unique features include unmolded handmade bricks set in a variety of patterns, extensive use of terra cotta, and an elaborate display of medieval iconography.

Founded in 1921 as a mission church to the University of Buffalo and the developing neighborhood around it, University Presbyterian Church continues its ministry with students, including an intentional Christian living program in the former manse. The church’s food pantry serves the needs of both students and others in the surrounding community.  Before construction was even completed the original wood frame church was too small. To meet the needs of ministry and outreach programs, the new sanctuary wing, with classroom and assembly spaces in the basement, was completed in 1928.The education wing was added in 1956.The architecture is recognized as a distinctive local example of a Georgian Colonial Revival style church, with a Wren-Gibbs inspired portico, tower, and steeple. The structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

There is no charge to join the tour, but pre-registration is required for virtual admission.

“Take a Walk” at Blessed Trinity with Explore Buffalo – May 15, 2021

Blessed Trinity docent
interprets iconography on the church façade.

Explore Buffalo Walking Tour
Blessed Trinity’s Exterior
Saturday, May 15, 2021 at 10:30 a.m.

Blessed Trinity is happy to announce the resumption of church tours with an Explore Buffalo Walking Tour of our Landmark building’s exterior on May 15, 2021. A team of Blessed Trinity docents will be happy to share their knowledge of the history and construction of this Lombard-Romanesque treasure, including the hand-formed Harvard bricks laid in a medieval fashion and the extensive used of terra cotta. And they’ll also help “crack the code” of the church’s medieval iconography. Bring your binoculars. There are examples of Christian symbolism on display all the way to the roof line! Plenty of off-street parking, too. This is a ticketed event, with a portion of the cost being returned to Blessed Trinity. For ticket information, click HERE.

Explore Buffalo “Takes a Walk” at Blessed Trinity – May 15, 2021

Blessed Trinity docent
interprets iconography on the church façade.

Explore Buffalo Walking Tour
Blessed Trinity’s Exterior
Saturday, May 15, 2021 at 10:30 a.m.

COVID protocols still restrict interior tours of Blessed Trinity, but we are delighted to welcome an Explore Buffalo Walking Tour of our Landmark building’s exterior on May 15, 2021. A team of Blessed Trinity docents will be happy to share their knowledge of the history and construction of this Lombard-Romanesque treasure, including the hand-formed Harvard bricks laid in a medieval fashion, the extensive used of terra cotta, and the church’s medieval iconography. Bring your binoculars. There are examples of Christian symbolism on display all the way to the roof line! Plenty of off-street parking, too. For ticket information, click HERE.

Watch Your Step

Our church is noted for its display of more than 2,000 symbols summarizing Christian beliefs, and many of them are under your feet! Twenty-four types of crosses can be found in 556 of our mosaic floor tiles. Another 158 tiles feature 24 additional symbols, including the signs of the zodiac. If you would like to help us maintain our Landmark house of prayer or help us to continue as an engaged parish community in the City of Buffalo, please click on our Donate link.

 

March 2021 – Interior Restoration Project Continues

Photo credit: Palma Zanghi

With repairs to the tile roof of the church – part of our grant project – completed, a project to repair damage to the church ceiling and interior artwork is underway. Following completion of the underlying plaster work, craftsmen from Bison Painting & Decorating Corp. are perched atop scaffolding, painstakingly restoring decorative stenciling and ceiling detail. A floor-level display created by master plasterer Josh of Mader Construction Co., Inc. helped parishioners to appreciate the process. For additional photos, visit our Facebook page. The work is scheduled to be completed by Holy Week.

Photo credit: Margaret Dick

February 2021 – Interior Restoration Project Underway

Now that repairs to the tile roof of the church – part of our grant project – have been completed, restoration of interior artwork and repairs to the ceiling of the church have begun. Master plasterer Josh of Mader Construction Co., Inc. helped parishioners to appreciate the process by setting up a display in church. In this photo, you can see the molds he makes to recreate deteriorated ornamental pieces. For additional photos, visit our Facebook page. The work is expected to continue through March 2021.